6676 4000
Showing posts from tagged with: Pilates surf circuits

What is an exercise physiologist?

20.01.20

What is an exercise physiologist?

An Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) is a university qualified allied health professional who specialises in the delivery of exercise and lifestyle programs for healthy individuals and those with chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities.   AEPs possess extensive knowledge, skills and experience in clinical exercise delivery. They provide health modification counselling for people with chronic disease and injury with a strong focus on behavioural change.   Working across a variety of areas in health, exercise and sport, services delivered by an AEP are also claimable under compensable schemes such as Medicare and covered by most private health insurers. When it comes to the prescription of exercise, they are the most qualified professionals in Australia.   What makes AEPs different to other exercise professionals?
  • They are university qualified
  • They undertake strict accreditation requirements with Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA)
  • They are eligible to register with Medicare Australia, the Department of Veteran’s Affairs and WorkCover, and are recognised by most private health insurers
  • They can treat and work with all people. From those who want to improve their health and well-being, to those with, or at risk of developing a chronic illness
Why should you see an AEP? AEPs are the experts in prescribing the right exercise to help you prevent/manage your chronic disease, help you recover faster from surgery or an injury, or help you to maintain a healthy lifestyle.   AEPs can help treat and/or manage:
  • Diabetes and pre-diabetes
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Arthritis and osteoporosis
  • Chronic respiratory disease and asthma
  • Depression and mental health conditions
  • Different forms of cancer
  • Musculoskeletal injuries
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Obesity
  • And much more!
    What makes AEPs even more special is they know how to set goals and maintain motivation, these are two aspects that will most commonly see people fail at exercise. What to expect when seeing an AEP?   During an initial consultation with your AEP, you will undertake a comprehensive assessment in order to develop an exercise plan based on your unique requirements. This session will likely be a fair few questions about your health and history. A lot of people are concerned about what to wear to this appointment. We always say wear comfortable clothing as you may be asked to do a range of movements and bring some comfortable walking shoes as you may need to complete an aerobic assessment. After this session, you will be provided with a plan of action. Working with an AEP can be a truly rewarding process and they can make a hugely positive impact to your life. Our AEP, Sammy, has special interests in the areas of Cancer and Exercise, Osteoporosis and Clinical Pilates. To make a booking with Sammy our AEP  please call 6676 4000 or 6676 4577.  

Patellofemoral pain

06.11.17

Experiencing knee pain while walking, running, squatting, kneeling, going up or down stairs or slopes?

You may have a condition known as Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome is one of the most common knee complaints of both the young active sportsperson and the elderly. Patellofemoral pain syndrome is the medical term for pain felt behind your kneecap, where your patella (kneecap) articulates with your thigh bone (femur). This joint is known as your patellofemoral joint Patellofemoral pain syndrome, is mainly due to excessive patellofemoral joint pressure from poor kneecap alignment, which in time, affects the joint surface behind the kneecap (retropatellar joint). Physiotherapy inventions help strengthen one’s quadriceps and hips, which subsequently aids in restoring the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint. Physiotherapists are able to advise and design customised exercise programs to improve the strength of your knee and leg muscles and help you maintain good general fitness. If you are experiencing patellofemoral pain, or any pain in your knee and joints, it is important to have your condition assessed by a physiotherapist. Patellofemoral pain typically develops because of 1 of 3 different reasons 1. Excessive pronation of the foot (flattening of the arch). It doesn't matter if you have high arches or flat feet, it depends on how much your arch flattens from non-weight baring to weight baring. This can be addressed in the short term with the use of orthotics but a strengthening program of the muscles that support your arch is recommended. 2. Weak quadriceps (weak thigh muscles). The quads are the largest muscle group in the body that we use to extend our knee. Important for walking, running, squatting, and climbing stairs. We can test your maximum isometric contraction and compare it to your unaffected side to see if this is a contributing factor and address any deficit with an appropriate strengthening program. 3. Weak hip abductors (gluteal muscles). Gluteus medius and minimus help to keep our pelvis level while walking and running. If your opposite hip dips then the knee you are standing on will drift inwards causing poor alignment of the patellofemoral joint. This deficit can be picked up with good observation skills and strength testing.    

Joel’s Birthday Blog

05.10.17

Why do you love Pilates? I enjoy being able to strengthen and stretch out my body..... any chance to take off shoes is welcome! I have had first hand experience with immediate relief. What is the best thing about being a physiotherapist? I enjoy the mental Challenge of problem solving with clients in a vulnerable situation, helping them understand whats going on ans what we can do to assist. De – escalating someone who has thought the worst of their situation, Instilling in them optimism and confidence is a great outcome and good feeling.   Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita physio? I have grow up in a small coastal village - I enjoy the friendly village feel. The vibe around town and in the clinic is fantastic. Over the past 4 years I have watched the growth of the town with this and the advancements in technology, The Clinic at Cabarita has come into its own.   Best relaxation tip To relax I enjoy Surfing and gardening. I also enjoy spending time with my wife and Chocolate Labrador Raz. Our Fruit trees are pumping out the good stuff at the moment, when I get home I wander outside (after taking off my shoes!) and pick the fruit and enjoy. Its a great way to slow down and switch off after a full day. Joel studying Best lifestyle tip Many people will know that I have been studying for my Masters in Physiotherapy, I have been practising during this time to take time out and have a surf or do something I love. If you are going to do post graduate study, my advice is to do it slowly, take your time. Favourite activity To go for a sunrise surf with friends.   Favourite recipe My  Nachos and Tacos .. I cook - however I'm the only one who likes it! A typical Sunday An early morning surf, followed by a bike ride with my wife to go and have Mexican!.. I do this every day... except for the Mexican... So wonderful living and working in paradise!   Joel and Kim  

Common Surfing Injuries – Ankles

25.07.17

Common Surfing Injuries - Ankles

Ankles are one of the most common joints injured whilst surfing and having adequate ankle mobility and stability are very important for surfing performance. Research has found ankle injuries to be increasingly prevalent, particularly amongst competitive surfers due to the demands of aerial surfing and other progressive manouveres.   Important elements of the prevention of ankle injuries include having adequate ankle range of movement. Having good ankle range of motion helps to protect the ankle against injury sustained from forceful landings, and also assists in the prevention of other lower limb injuries such as knee and hip conditions.  

How do I improve my ankle mobility?

There are many ways to increase ankle mobility, stretching is a simple solution that will help with this and lead to increases in ankle mobility.

Soleus stretch: keeping your heel planted, try and touch your front knee to the wall.

kneewallstretch100x100    

Gastrocnemius stretch: hold your leg straight behind you and lunge forward. A00667F01

 

 Ankle Stability

Ankle stability is another important aspect of the prevention of ankle injuries. Proprioception describes the awareness of where the body is in space and is an important aspect of the stability of a joint. Ways to train ankle proprioception include training on unstable surfaces such as the surf set or bosu ball. Other functional ways to increase ankle stability include practicing tasks like landing onto unstable surfaces and maintaining adequate lower limb strength.   Our surf performance Pilates classes focus specifically on training specific movement patterns and functional strength training to match the requirements needed whilst surfing. We integrate dynamic movement patterns and proprioceptive training tasks to increase balance, core stability and help to increase surfing performance and decrease risk of injury. To find out more about our surf performance classes, visit our website CLICK HERE  you can book online or call us on (02) 6676 4000.   http://pottsvillephysio.com.au/services-pilates-fitness-programs/    

Surfing injuries

08.03.17

  Being out at the sea, riding the mountainous waves, listening to the surf pounding in your ear can be an exhilarating experience. That, together with advances in surfboard technology, has made surfing an increasingly popular sport. However, it can be hazardous especially if you are starting out or if you are not physically fit. Even seasoned surfers may push their skills to the limit by tackling bigger waves and making daring manoeuvres that can land them into difficulty. Many people are injured while surfing. Some common surfing injuries are: Lacerations and/or contusions Cuts and bruises to the head, legs and feet can result from coming into contact either with their own or another surfer's board, the ocean floor, rock or debris. Sprains and strains involving the lumbar (lower back) or cervical (neck) regions, the shoulder and ankle are also common. Fractures Fractures to the head, ribs and shoulder may occur as the surfer comes into contact with a reef, rock or the ocean floor. In some cases the nose or teeth may be broken. Ear and eye damage The surfer's ears and eyes are also subjected to injury from direct trauma or from the UV rays of the sun reflecting on the water. A "wipe-out" may also perforate the eardrum. Over time, surfers can develop bony growths within the outer ear, a condition known as surfer's ear that leads to deafness.   Overuse injuries Overuse injuries take place as a result of paddling for prolonged periods face down on the board. The shoulder, neck and back are most affected. Surfing injuries can be prevented with the use of protective equipment. Nose guards attached to the front of the board can prevent injury if you come into contact with the board. Helmets are necessary when surfing over large waves or reefs; wet suits worn for warmth will guard against cuts from fins, and hoods can protect your ears during a wipe-out. Booties are worn for warmth by some surfers and these can also protect the feet from cuts. Anyone wanting to engage in this sport should be a strong swimmer, be physically fit and have a good understanding of what surfing entails before getting into the water. A physiotherapy program can help prepare the beginner for his new sport. If you have suffered injury, your physiotherapist will work on balance, flexibility, proprioception (sense of your own body position and orientation) and strength. Range of motion particularly in the legs and core muscles and shoulder will help. This, together with use of protective gear, will help you make a safe return to surfing.   Surfset