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Showing posts from tagged with: good habbits

Novel ways you can boost your immune system this winter

Smile: you are less likely to catch a cold if you are happy and relaxedLet it go: anger creates a stress response that affects your hormones, neurotransmitters and gut flora (where 80% of your immune cells live)

Walk in the park, bush or beach: spending time in a green space boosts immunity by switching on the para sympathetic nervous system (rest and repair state)

Sleep

Yoga or Pilates: bending and twisting is a natural immunity booster

Socialise

Bounce: get on the trampoline or rebounded to flush the lymphatic system

Massage: even a self massage 5 minutes per day prior

Breathe: slowly and gently. Your breathing should be silent and invisible.

Spend some time in the sunshine

Move: don’t sit for more than 1-2 hours at a time

What is Clinical Pilates and why has it made such an Impact?

What is Clinical Pilates and why has it made such an Impact?

Clinical Pilates has been shown to reduce the onset, persistence and recurrence of pain by addressing the neuromuscular dysfunction it is associated with. Clinical Pilates is largely concerned with training local spinal and pelvic stabilising muscles to work efficiently throughout functional activity. It is particularly important in the rehabilitation of spinal pain amongst other motor control problems and is associated to what researcher’s term “specific stabilisation exercises” or “motor control exercise”. With the latest research emerging, evidence-based Physiotherapists have re-evaluated their management of low back pain with a shift towards this type of exercise rather than focus on strength and endurance, which is perhaps more appropriate in the advanced stages of rehabilitation. CLINICAL PILATES involves the following components which are particularly helpful to aid in the rehabilitation of low back pain:
  1. Teaches co-activation of Transversus Abdominis (TA), Pelvic Floor (PF) and Multifidus (MF) muscles
Research into muscle dysfunction in patients with LBP has identified motor control impairments in the deep muscles of the trunk. These muscles normally contract in anticipation of movement to increase stability of the spine and pelvis. This anticipatory function is lost in patients with LBP and not restored with the resolution of symptoms  therefore requiring specific retraining.
  1. Teaches correct muscle activation patterns
A focus on low load high repetition optimizes tonic recruitment of the Type 1 stability muscles. Researchers suggest a prolonged low intensity (submaximal) contraction is effective in retraining the stability function of TA and MF. Further research proposes that specific exercises to train the deep abdominal muscles address any motor control deficits and this stability can provide the basis for more skilful functional activities.
  1. Trains local and global stability systems
Functional spinal stability is dependent on the integration of local and global muscle systems . Clinical Pilates progresses from basic exercises which recruit stability muscles separately to more complicated exercises that involve the larger, more superficial global abdominal muscles. Researchers  suggest specific exercises which isolate the local muscles independently from contraction of the global muscles has proved to be the most beneficial way of targeting them in rehabilitation programs and ensuring that the correct muscles are being activated.
  1. Trains neutral stability before end range stability
Clinical Pilates teaches participants the idea of neutral spine and encourages initial training in neutral and non-provocative postures. Spinal Instability occurring through injury or degeneration can contribute to an increase in the range of the neutral zone which is thought to be a primary source of LBP. This increased zone can be reduced to within physiological limits by re-educating the active system, more specifically the local stabilizers, thus relying less on the passive spinal structures to maintain posture.
  1. Progresses static stability to dynamic
This is in line with spinal stabilisation research programs which progress individuals into functional activity and sport specific exercises.
  1. Direction specific
Researchers  showed that performing exercises in a direction that does not reproduce symptoms was met with better outcomes than those exercised in provocative directions or with no direction preference. By employing this preference in Clinical Pilates the therapist is able to effectively “treat” the patient whilst they complete their rehab. For example, a patient with discogenic LBP requires extension biased exercises versus a patient with spondylolithesis with flexion biased exercises. Our Clinical Pilates program focuses on correcting the causative factors which have contributed to acute and recurrent conditions under the supervision of a Physiotherapist. It is a specific and progressive program aimed at Transverse Abdominus, Multifidus, Pelvic floor and Gluteal muscle control to help stabilise the spine, correct posture and improve strength, balance and confidence with movement. Our small groups, which still provide individual attention, are a great option once pain settles and can lead to enhanced compliance, better improvement and a more successful outcome in the long term versus home programs.

Carly’s Birthday Blog

Why do you love Pilates? I love Pilates because it is a form of exercise that can be modified to suit ANYONE. The layers of challenge you can add are endless. I also love that age is no barrier, it's the practice that counts! What's the best thing about being a physio? Being able to help people reach the goals that are most important to them. No matter how big or small, it's really rewarding to be a part of that journey. I also love that physio can take you in so many directions. From the clinic to the sports field, the possibilities are endless! Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita Physiotherapy ? I grew up in Cabarita, so it's nice to be able to come back to my roots. It's an amazing community with a great coastal vibe and being so close to the beach is always a plus. But, most importantly, the team is amazing! Best relaxation tip? A nice long walk along the beach followed by some guided meditation.  There is nothing better. Best lifestyle tip? Find something you love and do it consistently. Challenge yourself in some way each and every day. Favourite activity? Doing some high intensity interval training or boxing. It gets the heart racing and the sweat pouring. It's even better when you have some amazing people to work out with. Favourite recipe? Tacos. Need I say more? A special mention to Kai's choc chip oatmeal cookies. If you haven't tried them, you should! A typical Sunday... A nice long sleep in followed by a Pilates workout. I then like to go to one of my favourite cafes on the Coast and enjoy multiple coffees and a delicious brunch. You might catch me running around the rugby league scene in the afternoon. That's my other passion!Carly    

The Clinical Side to Yoga

What’s with all this Yoga hype?

If you haven’t heard about Yoga these days, I would be quite surprised. Yoga classes are offered all over the world, in all the many varieties, and Yoga is always talked about as the best thing you can do for yourself. There is no doubt that a class integrating your mind and body will do you well. But what if you have, or had, an injury? Will the Yoga class down the road from you still do you good?   Well let’s think about this…if you have a leak in your roof, do you want the roofer to do the same work on your roof as your neighbours who are just looking for general maintenance?  

…hence the formation of Clinical Yoga.

  We all understand that when an injury occurs, how we function immediately changes. Most importantly, how our muscles activate, or co-activate, completely fluctuates. The intention of Clinical Yoga is to take you through the stages of healing with balanced movement and precise activation patterns.   What is most commonly forgotten about injury is that our mind harbours the memory of your previous pain and tries protecting your body from a reoccurrence. As Yoga’s original basis is focused on unifying your mind and body, Clinical Yoga encapsulates this by freeing your mind of the fear of re-injury and enables you to progress back to natural movement.   As a little story of what a class is, the main difference falls into how Yoga poses are performed. Each asana (pose) in class is tailored directly to your body and your injury. Each series performed is simple, yet challenging. Each moment of challenge is balanced with a moment of ease. Each class is suitable for any age and physical ability, as the simplicity of the series will be adaptable for all levels. Each person that joins will be taught, or re-taught, the foundations of the practice. And each time you leave you will feel rejuvenated.   Once we are able to return back to our natural state, then of course it is time to jump back into the Yoga studio down the road from you!   As we all have our place in the healing process and the role of a general class (whether it’s PT, Pilates, Yoga or Spin) is to progress your uninjured body.  As Physiotherapists it is our place to bring you from pain to performance. For some insight from working in both phases, please allow yourself the pleasure to fully return to your natural movement before jumping back in. It is only favourable to yourself to get the most out of what each class has to offer.

Balance – Falls Prevention

What is a fall?

The World Health Organisation defines a fall as "inadvertently coming to rest on the ground, floor or lower level, excluding intentional change in position to rest in furniture, wall or other objects". Falls in older people cover a wide range of events, including:
  • trips on raised obstacles (eg. loose rugs, cords, mats) or uneven surfaces (eg. footpaths, roads)
  • slipping on wet or highly polished surfaces
  • tumbles and stumbles down steps or stairs
  • falling off a ladder or stepladder
  • falling over in a shopping centre or while using public transport.

What a fall is not:

 
  • Falls in older people are not accidents. Similarly, falls are not an inevitable or unavoidable part of life. The causes of a fall can usually be identified and the sequence of events leading up to the fall can be predicted and therefore can be prevented. o Unintentional falls continue to be the leading cause of injuries requiring hospitalisation in Australia.
 

Risk factors for falls

Physical inactivity
  • Physical activity has been shown to be the most promising falls prevention strategy, both as a single intervention and as a part of a multi-factorial approach.
  • Research shows that specific exercises such as Tai Chi, balance, gait training and strength building group classes or individualised in-home programs reduce falls risk by 12% and the number of falls by 19%.
  • These interventions can also increase the time before a person falls for the first time. A physical activity program should be specific for individuals and include exercise that challenges balance at a moderate to high extent with a attendance twice weekly.

What you can do to prevent a fall ?

Physical activity is key to preventing falls and improving well being! A holistic program including:
  • Proprioceptive retraining – challenging your body on unstable surfaces such as wobble discs and bosu balls helps to retrain your ability to recognise where your body is in space.
  • Strengthening – a full body strength program including lower limb, upper limb and core strengthening will help to mitigate the loss of muscle mass common in the older population.
  • Exercises such as squats, bridges, push ups and calf raises are useful examples of this.

Other modifiable risk factors for falls

Incontinence
  • Problems with bowel and bladder control can impact on an older person's ability to stay active, healthy and independent.
  • Incontinence, urinary frequency and assisted toileting have been identified as falls risk factors for residents in residential aged care facilities.
  • Physiotherapy can assist with incontinence.
Feet/footwear
  • Sore, aching or tired feet make it difficult for an older person to stay active and independent, and can affect the way they walk.
  • Some types of footwear such as slippers, thongs or scuffs, and wearing socks without shoes can increase the risk of falls
Low vision
  • Low vision, impaired vision, a change to vision or vision affected by medication can increase the risk of an older person falling. Vision impairment ranks sixth in the world's major causes of loss of wellbeing, and the prevalence of vision loss increases with age.
Medication
  • There is strong evidence that falls risk is increased by medications which act on the central nervous system, such as those used to treat depression, sleep disorders and anxiety.
  • For those using these medications to assist with sleep disorders and anxiety related health issues, there is a need for longer term support and use of non-pharmacological alternatives such as relaxation, reducing caffeine intake, increasing physical activity and meditation in the first instance. Home safety
  • The relative risk of falls can be reduced by 20% in those with a history of falling by an occupational therapist conducting a thorough home risk assessment and arranging the recommended modifications.
  • Tidying up behind you and not leaving objects on the floor can also help to prevent falls.
Nutrition
  • Nutrition is an important factor in falls prevention, as frailty results from a loss of muscle mass and strength, neuromuscular impairment, immobilisation and malnutrition.
  •  Older Australians are at risk of developing nutritional health problems due to reduced energy needs and a decreased ability to absorb nutrients.

Falls can be prevented!

Staying healthy and active, maintaining strength and balance, identifying falls risk factors and improving home safety will help to minimise the risk of falling. Talk to your physiotherapist today about minimising your falls risk factors or join our fit for life program.  

Birthday Blog – Helen – Fabulous Front Desk Team

30.03.17

Why do you love Pilates? I love the way Pilates makes me feel strong. It is such a great way of strengthening the body assisting with posture, body awareness and most importantly, keeping any niggles of pain at bay. Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita Physio? I am lucky in that I work 10 minutes from home and I get to work with such a great team of people. I have personally felt the benefits of Physiotherapy and Pilates and I see the improvements and positive impact that it has on our client’s lives every day, making it a very rewarding job. Best Relaxation tip: Taking a moment each day for yourself. Just stopping to take a few deep breaths, steady your mind and reset/recharge. Best Lifestyle tip: Do things you enjoy and spend time with people you enjoy being with. Favourite activity: Spending time in the kitchen and garden is quite therapeutic for me. I really enjoy cooking for family and friends and just pottering around in the garden. Favourite Recipe: My favourite foods to cook would be Greek or Mediterranean style. I make a delicious slow cooked lamb shoulder – throw the shoulder in the slow cooker with some herbs, spices and lemon and leave to cook for the day. I like to serve it with Cous Cous and a nice leafy Greek style salad. The whole family love it and it’s great for entertaining. A typical Sunday: Sundays for me usually involve a late breakfast, some quality family time and then cooking something yummy for dinner.   helly  

Rosie

Birthday Blog – Rosie Remedial Masseuse

28.03.17

Why do you love Pilates:
To be completely honest I haven't actually done Pilates, not that I wouldn't like to, It just hasn't found it's way into my life yet.
But I know that clinical Pilates is one of the best forms of rehab, and fitness out, I'll have to try it soon.
 
What is the best thing about being a Remedial Masseuse ?
Well as a Remedial therapist the best thing would be being able to help people along in their healing journey, helping them out of pain and therefore enjoying the activities they love.
Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita?
It's a beautiful clinic, by a beautiful river/beach, with beautiful staff. Plus, Pottsville is just 15-20 mins from my house which is a plus.
Best relaxation tip:
Tapping into the breath, giving yourself time to breathe deeply and think clearly. I also like to support myself by using calming essential oils like lavender or frankincense to relax as well.
Best lifestyle tip:
Love and care for yourself! I like to do this in ways like eating healthy and consciously, and finding a nice relationship with exercise, try and do it regularly and make it fun!
Favourite activity:
Dancing with friends.
Favourite recipe:
Baked white sweet potatoes served with quinoa and topped with fresh tomato, leafy greens, avocado, broccoli sprouts and hummus- YUM!
A typical Sunday:
Would probably involve a morning bike ride through the hills or to the beach with my partner or some yoga, or both. I'll probably be putting some love into house jobs too like washing or the garden etc And then possibly ending with dinner with friends or prepping for the week coming.

Reasons Why Having a Daily Routine is important (for Children AND Adults)!

1. Structure: Having a routine means you can decide what is important to you and create a routine to your day around these things. You can organise your life so it makes sense to you. E.G.- if you prefer to exercise in the morning you can lock in a set time every day for exercise such as 6.30-7.30 and work your morning routine around it. 2. What’s important gets done: you prioritise what is important to you and lock this in first and then fill the spare parts of your diary with the random tasks that pop up in life, rather than running around “putting out fires” or wasting time on other tasks such as social media or watching TV and then not having time left at the end of the day to do what you really want. I often say ‘we all have the same time available to us – it is what we choose to do with it that is different” 3. Good Habits Stick: if we continue to look at exercise as an example, putting exercise in your diary as part of your expected daily activities means you are much more likely to do it regularly and we all know things that we do often quickly become habits. Routine quickly becomes habit because it requires no thought to act. 4. Efficiency: How much time do you waste organising your days, deciding what to and not to do, well if you have a basic weekly routine alot of this decision making is already done for you saving you time and energy and making your life more EFFICIENT. Also there is a lot of talk about decision fatigue – we have so many decisions to make all the time that when the time comes to make important decisions we find it very difficult. It makes sense to work out a routine that suits you so you are not going through the same decision making process every day. A great example I love is wearing a uniform to work – no need to scour the wardrobe every morning wondering what to wear. 5. Saves work: if you do 1 load of washing everyday you won’t be facing an overflowing laundry basket that will take ½ day of your weekend to do 6. Negates the need for willpower or motivation: If it is locked into your daily routine you do it, and as we discussed before things you do often quickly become habits. How often have you set your alarm to go for a walk in the morning only to roll over and turn it off in the morning in favour of a sleep in? If your routine says you exercise at 6.30 everyday you will quickly get in the habit of doing exactly that (after a little initial will power and motivation to get you started) 7. Skills: You get better at what you do often -repetition leads to improvement 8. Relieves stress: many people feel overwhelmed in life with all the jobs that face us everyday especially if you are juggling work, family and other commitments. With a routine you know the important things are getting done. 9. Sleep better: Research shows going to bed at the same time every night and waking at the same time in the morning is one of the most important factors affecting how restorative our sleep is. So lock a bedtime into your routine and stick to it! 10. Children love routine: they have little control in their lives with what they do and when at both home and school so knowing when breakfast is, when we leave for school, bed time etc gives them a little more certainty to their day which in turn makes them less anxious.

Of course your whole life doesn’t have to be a routine – don’t schedule every minute of every day – a little flexibility and spontaneity goes along way. Strike a balance between the two.