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Showing posts from tagged with: fitness

Carly’s Birthday Blog

01.09.17

Why do you love Pilates? I love Pilates because it is a form of exercise that can be modified to suit ANYONE. The layers of challenge you can add are endless. I also love that age is no barrier, it's the practice that counts! What's the best thing about being a physio? Being able to help people reach the goals that are most important to them. No matter how big or small, it's really rewarding to be a part of that journey. I also love that physio can take you in so many directions. From the clinic to the sports field, the possibilities are endless! Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita Physiotherapy ? I grew up in Cabarita, so it's nice to be able to come back to my roots. It's an amazing community with a great coastal vibe and being so close to the beach is always a plus. But, most importantly, the team is amazing! Best relaxation tip? A nice long walk along the beach followed by some guided meditation.  There is nothing better. Best lifestyle tip? Find something you love and do it consistently. Challenge yourself in some way each and every day. Favourite activity? Doing some high intensity interval training or boxing. It gets the heart racing and the sweat pouring. It's even better when you have some amazing people to work out with. Favourite recipe? Tacos. Need I say more? A special mention to Kai's choc chip oatmeal cookies. If you haven't tried them, you should! A typical Sunday... A nice long sleep in followed by a Pilates workout. I then like to go to one of my favourite cafes on the Coast and enjoy multiple coffees and a delicious brunch. You might catch me running around the rugby league scene in the afternoon. That's my other passion!Carly    

Common Surfing Injuries – Ankles

25.07.17

Common Surfing Injuries - Ankles

Ankles are one of the most common joints injured whilst surfing and having adequate ankle mobility and stability are very important for surfing performance. Research has found ankle injuries to be increasingly prevalent, particularly amongst competitive surfers due to the demands of aerial surfing and other progressive manouveres.   Important elements of the prevention of ankle injuries include having adequate ankle range of movement. Having good ankle range of motion helps to protect the ankle against injury sustained from forceful landings, and also assists in the prevention of other lower limb injuries such as knee and hip conditions.  

How do I improve my ankle mobility?

There are many ways to increase ankle mobility, stretching is a simple solution that will help with this and lead to increases in ankle mobility.

Soleus stretch: keeping your heel planted, try and touch your front knee to the wall.

kneewallstretch100x100    

Gastrocnemius stretch: hold your leg straight behind you and lunge forward. A00667F01

 

 Ankle Stability

Ankle stability is another important aspect of the prevention of ankle injuries. Proprioception describes the awareness of where the body is in space and is an important aspect of the stability of a joint. Ways to train ankle proprioception include training on unstable surfaces such as the surf set or bosu ball. Other functional ways to increase ankle stability include practicing tasks like landing onto unstable surfaces and maintaining adequate lower limb strength.   Our surf performance Pilates classes focus specifically on training specific movement patterns and functional strength training to match the requirements needed whilst surfing. We integrate dynamic movement patterns and proprioceptive training tasks to increase balance, core stability and help to increase surfing performance and decrease risk of injury. To find out more about our surf performance classes, visit our website CLICK HERE  you can book online or call us on (02) 6676 4000.   http://pottsvillephysio.com.au/services-pilates-fitness-programs/    

Fathers Day Blog

24.07.17

As Father’s day approaches we have taken time to reflect on the influences that our Father's have had on us.

Dan,Matt, Joel and Kai have been interviewed,  below are their responses:

Dan and Ollie B& W

Dan

The 3 things you love about being a father; 1. Being able to watch your children grow and develop into their own personalities 2. It gives you the privilege of being able to see the world again through a child's eyes. Kids teach us to see the beauty in little day to day things that often we forgot to notice in our busy lives 3. I also love being able to share things that I love with my children. I get more joy out of seeing them catch a great wave or make it to the top of a mountain hike than I would if I was doing it myself  

Matt

The most Important things my father taught me... How to drive, swim, tumble turn in the ocean and how to not catch any fish What it would mean to be a father.. Being a father  (especially for the first born) would undoubtedly be the highlight of a man's life What is your favourite tradition with my Father? Growing up it was the New Year's Test at the Sydney Cricket Ground. Favourite activity to do with my Father Favourite activity is to be out in the ocean with Dad watching him negotiate the waves on his standup paddle board What is your Dad's favorite story about you as a Child? Favourite story would be about how I was running and jumping out of the cot by the age of about one. . Who are some other important Men in my life to recognise on Father's Day? Fred Hollows / My Granddad fishing

Joel

The most Important things my father taught me... Patience If things don't make you happy don't do them Go with the flow What is your favourite tradition with your Father? Surfing and going to Farmers market in Bellingen Favourite activity to do with your Father ? Surfing and laughing with him as he goes over the falls How would you describe your Father in 3 words Classic Aussie Larrikin  What is your Dad's favorite story about you as a Child? Hiding behind his leg because I was shy Who are some other important Men you would like to recognise on Father's Day? Huey ~ God of waves Poseidon ~  God of water   poseidon-1

Kai 

The most Important thing (or things) my father taught me... The most important thing my Dad has taught me is just to always try my best, try your hardest, don't worry about the outcome or results, just do your best. Dad has always had the best advice for me when I have needed it the most. Whenever I am really struggling and whenever I have faced my biggest challenges in life. Whether it was playing sport when I was younger or going through exams at University or just when it comes to big life and work decisions, Dad has always had the best advice and helped me to focus on take on any challenge the best I can. Favourite activity to do with your Father Favourite activity would probably be surfing or kite surfing with my Dad. Dad taught me to surf and kite surf and it is always awesome going out and enjoying those activities with him.
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14 Tips to get a better night sleep

20.06.17

14 Tips to get a better night sleep

 
  1. Eat for sleep: your body needs whole grains, nuts and green leafy vegetables to produce melatonin and serotonin – the sleep hormones
  2. Have your last meal 2 hours before bed so that digestion is complete, your blood sugar has stabilised and your body is ready for rest and rejuvenation. Make sure you are not going to bed hungry
  3. Drink enough water so you are not waking up thirsty during the night
  4. Make a lavender spray for your pillow (with water and pure lavender essential oil) lavender produces a deeper more restorative sleep
  5. Have a hot shower or bath 1-2 hours before bed – we sleep better on a decreasing temperature. As you get out of the hot bath your temperature will slowly decrease triggering sleep hormones to kick in
  6. Put lavender essential oil and magnesium salts in the bath. Magnesium is a known muscle relaxant and will help you wind down
  7. Have plants in your room to keep the air fresh (especially if you close all the windows)
  8. Switch off all electronic devices 2 hours before bed – back lit devices prevent melatonin from being released (which is our sleep hormone)
  9. If your mind is busy try reading a book in bed to calm the mind.
  10. Check your room temperature is somewhere between 18 and 25 degrees
  11. Expose your eyes to sunshine as soon as you wake up to stop melatonin and balance the bodies sleep / wake cycle
  12. Have a sleep routine: aim to go to bed and get up at the same time every day
  13. Avoid alcohol in the evening– it might help you to get to sleep but your sleep will be lighter, disruptive, and less restorative.
  14. 10pm is when melatonin production should be at its highest - so be sure to get to bed by 10pm every night.
download (1) MG spray

Birthday Blog – Shannon

24.04.17

 
Why do you love pilates:
 It's just like Yoga to resistance... Plus it's fun to relearn how to use your body.
What is the best thing about being a physiotherapist?
 Being a physio is wonderful, I basically just get to chit chat about bodies all day (which I do in or outside of work).
Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita Physiotherapy ?
The people here are awesome (that includes all you clients too!).
I Love how friendly and supportive everybody has been since the first day I started here.
Best relaxation tip:
 Please breathe
Best lifestyle tip:
 Slowwww down
Favourite activity:
 Playing outside
Favourite recipe:
 Recipe? Who uses recipes? I usually make everything up as a I go!
A typical Sunday:
Wake up, Yoga session, then a nice long late breakfast

The Clinical Side to Yoga

20.04.17

What’s with all this Yoga hype?

If you haven’t heard about Yoga these days, I would be quite surprised. Yoga classes are offered all over the world, in all the many varieties, and Yoga is always talked about as the best thing you can do for yourself. There is no doubt that a class integrating your mind and body will do you well. But what if you have, or had, an injury? Will the Yoga class down the road from you still do you good?   Well let’s think about this…if you have a leak in your roof, do you want the roofer to do the same work on your roof as your neighbours who are just looking for general maintenance?  

…hence the formation of Clinical Yoga.

  We all understand that when an injury occurs, how we function immediately changes. Most importantly, how our muscles activate, or co-activate, completely fluctuates. The intention of Clinical Yoga is to take you through the stages of healing with balanced movement and precise activation patterns.   What is most commonly forgotten about injury is that our mind harbours the memory of your previous pain and tries protecting your body from a reoccurrence. As Yoga’s original basis is focused on unifying your mind and body, Clinical Yoga encapsulates this by freeing your mind of the fear of re-injury and enables you to progress back to natural movement.   As a little story of what a class is, the main difference falls into how Yoga poses are performed. Each asana (pose) in class is tailored directly to your body and your injury. Each series performed is simple, yet challenging. Each moment of challenge is balanced with a moment of ease. Each class is suitable for any age and physical ability, as the simplicity of the series will be adaptable for all levels. Each person that joins will be taught, or re-taught, the foundations of the practice. And each time you leave you will feel rejuvenated.   Once we are able to return back to our natural state, then of course it is time to jump back into the Yoga studio down the road from you!   As we all have our place in the healing process and the role of a general class (whether it’s PT, Pilates, Yoga or Spin) is to progress your uninjured body.  As Physiotherapists it is our place to bring you from pain to performance. For some insight from working in both phases, please allow yourself the pleasure to fully return to your natural movement before jumping back in. It is only favourable to yourself to get the most out of what each class has to offer.

Balance – Falls Prevention

31.03.17

What is a fall?

The World Health Organisation defines a fall as "inadvertently coming to rest on the ground, floor or lower level, excluding intentional change in position to rest in furniture, wall or other objects". Falls in older people cover a wide range of events, including:
  • trips on raised obstacles (eg. loose rugs, cords, mats) or uneven surfaces (eg. footpaths, roads)
  • slipping on wet or highly polished surfaces
  • tumbles and stumbles down steps or stairs
  • falling off a ladder or stepladder
  • falling over in a shopping centre or while using public transport.

What a fall is not:

 
  • Falls in older people are not accidents. Similarly, falls are not an inevitable or unavoidable part of life. The causes of a fall can usually be identified and the sequence of events leading up to the fall can be predicted and therefore can be prevented. o Unintentional falls continue to be the leading cause of injuries requiring hospitalisation in Australia.
 

Risk factors for falls

Physical inactivity
  • Physical activity has been shown to be the most promising falls prevention strategy, both as a single intervention and as a part of a multi-factorial approach.
  • Research shows that specific exercises such as Tai Chi, balance, gait training and strength building group classes or individualised in-home programs reduce falls risk by 12% and the number of falls by 19%.
  • These interventions can also increase the time before a person falls for the first time. A physical activity program should be specific for individuals and include exercise that challenges balance at a moderate to high extent with a attendance twice weekly.

What you can do to prevent a fall ?

Physical activity is key to preventing falls and improving well being! A holistic program including:
  • Proprioceptive retraining – challenging your body on unstable surfaces such as wobble discs and bosu balls helps to retrain your ability to recognise where your body is in space.
  • Strengthening – a full body strength program including lower limb, upper limb and core strengthening will help to mitigate the loss of muscle mass common in the older population.
  • Exercises such as squats, bridges, push ups and calf raises are useful examples of this.

Other modifiable risk factors for falls

Incontinence
  • Problems with bowel and bladder control can impact on an older person's ability to stay active, healthy and independent.
  • Incontinence, urinary frequency and assisted toileting have been identified as falls risk factors for residents in residential aged care facilities.
  • Physiotherapy can assist with incontinence.
Feet/footwear
  • Sore, aching or tired feet make it difficult for an older person to stay active and independent, and can affect the way they walk.
  • Some types of footwear such as slippers, thongs or scuffs, and wearing socks without shoes can increase the risk of falls
Low vision
  • Low vision, impaired vision, a change to vision or vision affected by medication can increase the risk of an older person falling. Vision impairment ranks sixth in the world's major causes of loss of wellbeing, and the prevalence of vision loss increases with age.
Medication
  • There is strong evidence that falls risk is increased by medications which act on the central nervous system, such as those used to treat depression, sleep disorders and anxiety.
  • For those using these medications to assist with sleep disorders and anxiety related health issues, there is a need for longer term support and use of non-pharmacological alternatives such as relaxation, reducing caffeine intake, increasing physical activity and meditation in the first instance. Home safety
  • The relative risk of falls can be reduced by 20% in those with a history of falling by an occupational therapist conducting a thorough home risk assessment and arranging the recommended modifications.
  • Tidying up behind you and not leaving objects on the floor can also help to prevent falls.
Nutrition
  • Nutrition is an important factor in falls prevention, as frailty results from a loss of muscle mass and strength, neuromuscular impairment, immobilisation and malnutrition.
  •  Older Australians are at risk of developing nutritional health problems due to reduced energy needs and a decreased ability to absorb nutrients.

Falls can be prevented!

Staying healthy and active, maintaining strength and balance, identifying falls risk factors and improving home safety will help to minimise the risk of falling. Talk to your physiotherapist today about minimising your falls risk factors or join our fit for life program.  

Rosie

Birthday Blog – Rosie Remedial Masseuse

28.03.17

Why do you love Pilates:
To be completely honest I haven't actually done Pilates, not that I wouldn't like to, It just hasn't found it's way into my life yet.
But I know that clinical Pilates is one of the best forms of rehab, and fitness out, I'll have to try it soon.
 
What is the best thing about being a Remedial Masseuse ?
Well as a Remedial therapist the best thing would be being able to help people along in their healing journey, helping them out of pain and therefore enjoying the activities they love.
Why work at Pottsville and Cabarita?
It's a beautiful clinic, by a beautiful river/beach, with beautiful staff. Plus, Pottsville is just 15-20 mins from my house which is a plus.
Best relaxation tip:
Tapping into the breath, giving yourself time to breathe deeply and think clearly. I also like to support myself by using calming essential oils like lavender or frankincense to relax as well.
Best lifestyle tip:
Love and care for yourself! I like to do this in ways like eating healthy and consciously, and finding a nice relationship with exercise, try and do it regularly and make it fun!
Favourite activity:
Dancing with friends.
Favourite recipe:
Baked white sweet potatoes served with quinoa and topped with fresh tomato, leafy greens, avocado, broccoli sprouts and hummus- YUM!
A typical Sunday:
Would probably involve a morning bike ride through the hills or to the beach with my partner or some yoga, or both. I'll probably be putting some love into house jobs too like washing or the garden etc And then possibly ending with dinner with friends or prepping for the week coming.

Golf Blog – Carly Jennar

27.03.17

The popularity of golf has increased substantially over the past few years with an estimated 55 million players worldwide.  With increased accessibility and participation rates, the sport of golf offers up a diversity of player profiles, ages and levels of experience. Golf is generally considered to be a moderate risk activity with respect to the development of injury.  Up to 80% of all golfing injures are due to overuse with the remainder resulting from trauma or contact. The most common areas for injuries in golfers include:

Low back and trunk

Injuries represent the highest incidence of injury affecting up to 1/3 of golfers. Due to the increased rotational forces placed on the spine during the golf swing and the asymmetric nature of the swing, the back is subject to increased forces and potential for injury.

Upper limb injuries are far more common than lower limb injuries.

 
  • Shoulder injuries are usually related to overuse and are due primarily to increased rotary forces (internal and external rotation) at the beginning and at the end of the swing. Common injuries include rotator cuff pathology, AC joint pain and shoulder instability.
  • Elbows are the second most frequently injured area. Overuse injuries to the tendons of the medial epicondyle (golfer’s elbow) and lateral epicondyle or (tennis elbow) are common.  Interestingly, tennis elbow is 5 times more common than golfer’s elbow among amateur players - likely a result of poor biomechanics such as over-swinging.
  • Wrist and hand injuries can result from blunt force with the ground or overuse. Fractures, subluxations and tenosynovitis are most commonly seen.

Lower limb injuries are much less frequent and can be attributed to both the swing as well as the walking loads between holes.

 
  • Hip injuries are often a result of the increased rotational forces placed on the hip during the swing. Soft tissue injuries to the groin and gluteals have been noted, as well as trochanteric bursitis.
  • Knee pain is often associated with meniscal injury due to the twisting moments placed on the knee during the swing. Osteoarthritis of the knee can also be aggravated during the swing or when walking.
  • Foot and Ankle pain are less common, with ankle sprains and plantar fasciopathy of note.

Risk Factors

 
  • The main risk factor associated with injury is a lower handicap (increased proficiency) likely due to the increased hours spent training and playing golf – think overuse and/or over training.
  • An age of >50 years old was also observed as in increased risk factor, primarily due to the physiological changes associated with ageing.
  • Other factors increasing risk of injury include lack of warming-up, reduced mobility/flexibility and poor physical conditioning.
  • Muscular imbalances have also been shown to increase injury risk, particularly during intense play or with high practice hours.
  • Collision injuries are most commonly related to contact with golf balls and clubs and in some instances, the golf-cart!
  • Poor swing mechanics and incorrect grip and set-up.

Prevention

 
  • Evidence exists for the implementation of a holistic training program to reduce golf-related injuries.

Programs involving: 

 
  • Flexibility with specific focus on the shoulder and hip (particularly the hip flexors);
  • Mobility particularly of the thoracic spine;
  • Core stability to support the large rotational forces of the spine during swing;
  • Balance to provide a solid foundation for the swing;
  • Resistance exercises with particular focus on large muscle groups and scapular stabilisers.
  • An adequate warm-up prior to commencing play e.g. dynamic stretching including trunk rotations and knees to chest.
  • Assessment and correction of any muscular asymmetries or range of motion deficits;
  • Optimisation of swing biomechanics by a golfing coach.
 

If you are looking to improve your golf game or you have done yourself an injury, contact Pottsville & Cabarita Physiotherapy for an assessment.  Alternatively, you come and try out our fitness Pilates circuits - they will be sure to help you hit that hole-in-one!

What is the best training for surfing? – Kai Allison

15.03.17

There are many different ways to train for surfing, each one with it’s own strengths and limitations. Surfing is a challenging sport that incorporates a number of physical skills and abilities. Much of the training for surfing has previously involved isolated movements and lacked specificity and functional relevance to the sport. People in the past have said that surfing itself is the best form of training, due largely to the difficulty in replicating the demands of surfing on dry land. Whilst nothing will ever replicate the same thrill, uncertainty and excitement unique to surfing, the surfset is a way to increase the functionality of training for surfing. The surfset is specifically designed for surfing training and can be seen as a more functional approach to training for surfers, as it enables replication of the movements and perturbation challenges inherent in surfing. The surfset consists of a modified surfboard set upon unstable surface, which creates a functional platform to replicate the dynamic integration of body systems required in surfing. The surfset is designed to engage the core and stabilising muscles, through challenging the body in a dynamic environment. Exercising on the surfset is a full-body approach to training, moving away from training in isolated and non-functional ways. Training in this way helps to develop functional movements sequences and functional muscle activation patterns specific to surfing, resulting in improved function and surfing performance. Workouts on the surfset can be specifically designed to develop aspects of surfing performance such as aerobic fitness, along with muscular strength, power, endurance in addition to balance and coordination. Workouts can also be designed to isolate specific movement sequences in surfing such as the pop up and allows replication of the dynamic balance and proprioceptive demands of surfing. In addition to being a challenging full body workout, exercising on the surfset is also a fun, engaging and unique way to exercise.  

Is there any evidence for exercising with the surfset?

  Completing exercises such as squats on unstable surfaces such as a surfset has been found to increase core muscle activation, along with an increase in lower limb muscle activity, making this type of training particularly effective and functional for this population (Nairn, Sutherland & Drake, 2017).   Specific benefits of surfset training can also be related to common injuries in surfing. Ankle injuries and sprains are one of the most common injuries in surfing and training on the surfset can be targeted specifically to rehabilitate functional stability, range of movement, balance and proprioception for these injuries (Nathanson, Haynes & Galanis, 2002).  

To summarise, the benefits of training on the surfset include: 

 
  • Increased dynamic balance
  • Improved core stability
  • Greater lower limb joint proprioception
  • Development and refinement of surf specific movement patterns
  • Increases in muscular power, strength and endurance
  • Greater aerobic fitness
  Training on the surfset provides the opportunity to incorporate functional movement sequences unique to surfing, whilst incorporating the same dynamic balance demands and challenges involved in surfing. Thus, the surfset is a highly functional and specific way of training for surfing and has the potential to result in increased surf fitness and greater performance, which is essentially what we are all searching for. To find out more go to: http://www.surfsetfitness.com To book a surf fitness class go to: http://pottsvillephysio.com.au   References   Nathanson, A., Haynes, P., & Galanis, D. (2002). Surfing injuries. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 20(3), 155-160. doi:10.1053/ajem.2002.32650     Nairn, Sutherland and Drake. (2017). Motion and Muscle Activity Are Affected by Instability Location During a Squat Exercise. Journal of strength and conditioning research. 31(3). DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001745