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Is Osteoarthritis causing you hip or knee pain? GLA:D Evidence based treatment for hip and knee arthritis

29.03.19

Is Osteoarthritis causing you hip or knee pain?

GLA:D Evidence based treatment for hip and knee arthritis

GLA:D®, or Good Life with Arthritis: Denmark, is an education and exercise program developed by researchers in Denmark for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis symptoms.  

What does GLA:DTM involve?

This education and exercise program reflects the latest evidence in osteoarthritis (OA) research. It also includes feedback from people with OA and trainers on what works in the real world to help patients manage OA symptoms.

GLA:DTM Australia training consists of:

  • A first appointment explaining the program and collecting data on your current functional ability
  • Two education sessions which teach you about OA, how the GLA:D™ Australia exercises improve joint stability, and how to retain this improved joint stability outside of the program
  • Group neuromuscular training sessions twice a week for six weeks to improve muscle control of the joint which leads to reduction in symptoms and improved quality of life
  Pottsville and Cabarita have partnered with GLA:D to offer this program at our clinics. The education sessions are free. The cost of the program is $440 and includes an initial and post program individual Physio session and 12 group GLA:D exercise sessions. It is strongly recommended to participate in the supervised program for optimal results. However if this is not possible you can do individual sessions which cost $35 supplemented by a home program . You do not need a referral from you Doctor, however you may be eligible for a rebate from Medicare for some of the cost of the program, if deemed appropriate by your GP. All sessions are claimable through private health funds.

Can I Participate in GLA:DTM Australia?

GLA:D™ Australia is a program for all individuals who experience any hip and/or knee osteoarthritis symptoms, regardless of severity. You may participate in the GLA:D™ Australia program if you have a hip or knee joint problem that resulted in visiting a health care provider.

You may not be able to participate in the GLA:D™ Australia program if:

  • You have other reasons for your hip and/or knee pain, including; tumor, inflammatory joint disease, result of hip fracture, soft tissue or connective tissue problems
  • You have other symptoms that are more pronounced than the osteoarthritis problems (for example chronic generalized pain or fibromyalgia)
  • You are unable to understand and communicate in English
 

OA Treatment in Australia

OA is the most common lifestyle disease in individuals 65 year of age and older, but can also affect individuals as young as 30 years of age. Current national and international clinical guidelines recommend patient education, exercise and weight loss as first line treatment for osteoarthritis. GLA:DTM Australia program offers a proven and effective exercise and education based framework for the treatment of hip and knee OA.

Background of the GLA:D® Program

Research from the GLA:D® program in Denmark found symptom progression reduces by 32%. Other outcomes include a less pain, reduced use of joint related pain killers, and less people on sick leave. GLA:D® participants also reported high levels of satisfaction with the program and increased levels of physical activity 12 months after starting the program.  

This program is unique in that the education and exercises provided can be applied to everyday activities. By strengthening and correcting daily movement patterns, participants will train their bodies to move properly, prevent symptom progression and reduce pain.

   

Quick Facts

 
  • GLA:D has been proven to have dramatic effects in reducing pain of OA hip and knee by an average of 32%
 
  • The program is open to anyone with hip or knee OA, even if it is severe.
 
  • GLA:D has been shown to be far superior to other treatments such as anti-inflammatories, injections and arthroscopic surgery
 

Find out more about GLA:DTM

Pottsville and Cabarita Physiotherapy P: 02 6676 4000 E:  [email protected] W: www.pottsvillephysio.com.au        

Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondyalgia)

Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondyalgia)

  If you have tennis elbow you can experience pain when performing gripping tasks or resisted wrist/finger extension. Pain can also be present when your forearm muscles are stretched. There is probably tenderness directly over the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outside of the elbow, and tender points (trigger points) in the forearm muscles. In some cases, you may also experience neck stiffness and tenderness, and possibly also signs of nerve irritation like numbness and tingling. Most elbow movements are pain-free despite the surrounding area being painful.

WHO IS AFFECTED?

  You don’t have to be a tennis player to suffer from tennis elbow. It is caused by the repetitive movements and the gripping actions common in tennis hence the term ‘tennis’ elbow. However, it may also occur in other activities requiring repetitive gripping actions. Tennis elbow can therefore stem from daily activities such as using scissors, cutting meat, carrying grocery bags, gardening, manual work that involves repetitive turning or lifting of the wrist, such as plumbing, or bricklaying, and typing.

ACUTE VS CHRONIC

  Acute tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is an injury to structures involved in extending (straightening) the wrist and fingers at the site where the forearm muscles attach to the bone via the extensor tendon. It occurs when more force is applied to that area than the normal healthy tissue can handle. For example:
  • Unaccustomed hand use such as starting the tennis season,or increasing the frequency or amount of time playing tennis too quickly. Sometimes just a weekend of home DIY may trigger it
  • Excessive gripping or wringing activities, possibly a new racket or different grip size
  • Poor forearm muscle strength or tight muscles
  • Poor technique (this may be a poor tennis shot).
  Chronic (ie. longer term) tennis elbow is associated with degenerative changes in the tendon. While a sudden acute flare up of tennis elbow may have some inflammation or swelling, chronic tennis elbow generally doesn’t involve inflammation and is instead associated with changes in the nerves and blood supply to the tendon.   Unfortunately, rest as a treatment is rarely helpful. If left untreated, tennis elbow can last anywhere from 6 months to 2 years and can have a serious effect on your sport, daily activities and work. Physiotherapy is effective both in acute and chronic tennis elbow, and there are several things you can do to help in recovery and prevention.  

TREATMENT

  Tennis elbow should be diagnosed by a physiotherapist or doctor. A history is taken, and tests performed. Referred pain from the neck and reduced nerve mobility can mimic tennis elbow. The physical therapist must check your neck and clear it from any involvement in your elbow pain. An ultrasound scan or MRI are the best tests to identify tendon damage,but are often not necessary.   Physical or manual therapy treatments than can help include:
  • Massage therapy to relieve pain and stretch tight muscles and structures
  • Manual therapy can mobilise joints in the elbow and around the neck to ensure normal function
  • Taping and braces are beneficial in reducing pain in the elbow and supporting the muscles when you return to sport n Ice and ultrasound therapy may be used to reduce inflammation.
  • Dry needling can also be effective for pain relief, releasing trigger points in the muscle and promoting tissue healing
  • Exercise therapy should be prescribed to strengthen and balance the muscles of the forearm. While stretches help to lengthen tight muscles.
  Other treatment options may include injections, which should only be considered if the exercises have not helped. Surgery can be carried out under local injection (subcutaneous tenotomy) with a 95% success rate and no reduction in grip strength.   You need to try and prevent tennis elbow from occurring or recurring, which unfortunately it has a tendency to do, which means finding out what caused the injury and addressing these issues with the help of your therapist.

Don’t Let Yourself Be Sidelined by Tennis Injuries

01.02.19

Don’t Let Yourself Be Sidelined by Tennis Injuries

  Tennis is one of the most popular sports throughout the world, with approximately 75 million participants worldwide. It is a sport that you can play at every age and at every level. Children can start playing from the age of 4, using softer, slower balls and smaller rackets on modified courts to make the game easier and more fun, gradually progressing to regular rackets, balls and courts. Older players can start the sport at any age and can continue playing all their life. Whether you are looking for the competitive club league tennis or a more social game amongst friends, tennis is an excellent sport with loads of health benefits. Tennis is a fun and social (as well as competitive) way to add to your weekly activity goals.

Here are some amazing benefits of participating in regular activities like tennis:

1.    Increased brain power From alertness to tactical thinking, tennis enhances the neural connections in your brain. Kids who play tennis regularly get better grades at school. 2.    Better hand–eye coordination Playing tennis involves regular skills that all contribute to good hand–eye coordination. You can improve your agility, balance, coordination, reaction time and more. This can benefit you in injury prevention where improved balance and agility can help protect against rolling an ankle or tripping and falling often resulting in sprains or Colles fracture of the wrist or worse a hip fracture in older age. 3.    Reduced stress Tennis involves physical, mental, social and emotional challenges, which increase your capacity to deal with stress. Or simply running around smashing some balls may help you to blow off some stress too! 4.    Strong heart Compared with other sports, tennis players have the lowest incidence of cardiovascular disease. Playing just 3 hours a week will reduce your risk of heart disease by 56%. 5.    Higher fitness levels Playing tennis on a regular basis (2–3 times/week), either singles or doubles, meets the global exercise recommendations and leads to increased fitness levels. Tennis is an excellent interval training technique - running, stopping, burst of activity then rest between points or games (which elevates and then lowers heart rate repeatedly through a match) which is proven to be hugely beneficial in improving fitness levels and in cardiovascular conditioning too. The effect is not only seen in elite players but with recreational tennis too. 6.    Leaner body Tennis is an excellent and fun way to burn calories and lose weight. An hour of singles play can burn 580–870 calories. A lower body weight has immense benefits in preventing and managing cardiovascular diseases including diabetes, and a lighter frame will reduce loading on your back and joints reducing joint pain and possible arthritis in older age. 7.    Strong bones Playing tennis on a regular basis leads to stronger, healthier bones. This effect is strongest in those who play tennis from an early age, but even if you start playing tennis later in life you can benefit from the positive effect on your bones. This is applicable to both women and men combating the development of osteoporosis a.k.a. brittle bones with ageing. 8.    Strong leg muscles Playing tennis strengthens your leg muscles, which helps maintain your mobility and independence in old age.

The Secret is Staying Injury Free

But these health benefits won’t be very fruitful is you are sitting side-lined because of injuries and while some injuries are quick to repair, others can take a couple of weeks and others may be more stubborn, taking 6 weeks or more. What’s more frustrating, and unfortunately very common, is the risk of re-injury. One of the greatest risk factors for an ankle sprain or a muscle strain (tear) is having suffered from a previous sprain or strain. Nearly 2/3rds of tennis injuries are chronic overuse injuries, many of which are caused by poor technique, incorrect equipment use and lack of physical conditioning

Acute injuries, like an ankle sprain or calf strain, although sudden and unpredictable can also be prevented with adequate preparation and appropriate conditioning. Chat to one of our friendly staff for more information on how to prevent common tennis injuries and stay in the game longer!

Cancer and Exercise

      The potential benefits of exercise during and after treatment are significant and research has proved its effectiveness. Exercise during chemotherapy can help ease side effects, such as fatigue and nausea, and can help to boost the immune system of those undergoing cancer treatments. Chemotherapy side effects can sometimes make exercising tough, but it’s recommended to try to be as active as possible during treatment. Benefits of an appropriately prescribed exercise program in this population include improved:

  • Muscle mass, strength, power
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Physical function
  • Physical activity levels
  • Range of motion
  • Immune function
  • Chemotherapy completion rates
  • Reduced anxiety and depression

Chocolate and health benifits

29.11.18

Research shows that over 70% of us treat ourselves to chocolate at least once a week.

  Good quality dark, raw chocolate  (at least 70% cocoa) has impressive health benefits: ·         Boosts energy levels ·         Improves blood flow which is great for your cardiovascular health ·         Releases endorphins which helps with pain relief ·         Relaxes muscles due to the magnesium content ·         Tryptophan (the precursor of serotonin) boosts happiness ·         May improve cognitive performance ·         Anti-oxidants work to fight cellular and oxidative damage resulting in clearer, firmer skin  

Is screen time affecting more than kids minds?

29.11.18

Is screen time affecting more than kids minds?

    The increased use of screens is probably the biggest change in childhood activity patterns since the introduction of the television 50 years ago. It is likely to have a big impact on children’s health and habits now and throughout their life. The high use of devices in childhood is likely to have a knock on effect later in life with increased risk of; • Obesity • Cardio and metabolic problems • Social and psychological issues • Musculoskeletal problems especially in the neck. Spending numerous hours in a poor neck posture with very little neck movement will make children more vulnerable to neck pain later in life.   There is a lot of research emerging that neck and back problems begin in adolescence – hence the importance of exploring prevention in childhood. The strongest predictor of whether you are going to suffer from neck or back pain in the future is if you have already had it, so stopping that first occasion of pain will have a significant impact! The research also suggests: • that children will also grow up with poor gross motor skills • Children who watch more TV or devices then their peers will have weaker bones by aged 20

Surveys suggest 2/3 of children aged 0-5 are spending at least 30 min per day on devices.

Australian Department of Health guidelines for screen time suggest that children under 2 have NO screen time.

Please click on the below links for guidelines for Physical activity for 0-5 year olds and 5 - 12 year olds.

Link for guidelines for physical activity for 0- 5 5-12 year olds  

Top 8 tips for exercising in the hot weather

04.11.18

Top 8 tips for exercising in the hot weather

 

  1. 1. Exercise Early or Late. It’s usually cooler in the early morning and late evening.

2. Light coloured clothing will help you to stay cooler

3. Wear fabric with moisture-wicking properties and loose clothing is better than tight.

4. Keep your fluids up: water or coconut water a good choices, try to drink every 15 minutes

5. Exercise in water: swim / surf or water running

6. Wear a hat and sunglasses

7. Stay our of the direct sun if possible

8. Listen to your body: STOP if you feel faint, dizzy or nauseous.

8 tips to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes

04.11.18

8 tips to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes:

1. Manage your weight and avoid excess fat especially around your abdomen

2. Eat a healthy, balanced diet.

3. Reduce your alcohol content

4. Exercise regularly.

5. Avoid cigarettes.

6. See your GP for regular checkups

7. Control your blood pressure

8. Reduce stress in your life

What is Osteoporosis?

22.10.18

What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones lose calcium, become fragile and tend to fracture readily. It is most common in women over 40 years of age. Your doctor may organize a bone density scan to see if you have, or are at risk of developing osteoporosis.

What causes Osteoporosis?

  Throughout life bone tissue is very active and is constantly being ‘remodelled’. Microscopic amounts of bone are continually being removed and reformed. The bone continues to thicken until your early 20’s, this is your peak bone mass. After about 40 or 50 years more bone is removed then laid down, and gradually the density decreases. During menopause the decline in oestrogen levels results in an accelerated bone loss.  

Who is at risk?

 
  • Over 40 years old
  • Family history
  • Caucasian
  • Women after menopause
  • Smokers
  • High intake of alcohol, salt, caffeine
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • If you have dieted during your life and limited intake of calcium rich foods.
 

Exercise and Osteoporosis

  Research shows that regular lifelong weight bearing exercise and light weight training has a positive effect on bone density. Swimming and cycling although good for your fitness are not as beneficial as walking, dancing, tennis or gentle weight bearing circuit classes. Bone is a living tissue and responds to the stress of weight bearing exercise by becoming stronger. You need to aim for at least three sessions per week. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE TO START, even if you are past your peak bone mass, exercise will reduce bone loss and help delay the progress of Osteoporosis. Pottsville Physiotherapy Fit for Life circuit classes incorporate weight bearing exercise, light resistance training and balance / coordination training to help maintain your bone density, improve your posture and balance and help prevent falls. Exercise to avoid: If you have been diagnosed with osteoporosis you will need to avoid excessive twisting, bending, heavy lifting, jolting, dynamic sit ups, and high impact activities such as running and jumping.

Exercise Tips

 
  • Warm up first
  • Slow and controlled movement
  • Don’t hold your breath
  • Do not push into pain

Other Treatments

 
  • Your doctor may prescribe medications i.e.- hormone replacement therapy
  • Diet and or supplements to ensure adequate calcium intake (your doctor or a dietician can advise you on this)
  • Lifestyle factors—quit smoking, decrease salt, alcohol and caffeine intake (these all limit calcium absorption)

How much calcium do I need?

  Young adults - 800-1200mg per day Menstruating women800-1000mg per day  Men800  Pregnant/lactating women  - 1200mg per day Post menopausal women(no oestrogen) - 1500mg per day Post menopausal women(oestrogen) - 1000 - 1200mg  per day Adults over 65 years -  1500mg per day     Food                                                       Amount                                              Calcium (mg)   Low fat milk                                         1 glass (250ml)                                                 405 Soya beverage                                   1 glass                                                                  365 Yoghurt                                                200g                                                                      330 Whole milk                                         1 glass                                                                  300 Hard cheese                                       1 slice (30g)                                                        285 Canned sardines inc bones           (50g)                                                                     275 Processed cheese                            30g                                                                        190 Oysters                                                10                                                                          190 Tofu                                                       100g                                                                     130 Almonds                                              50g                                                                        125 Baked beans                                       1 cup (240g)                                                       108 Canned salmon, inc bones            100g                                                                      90 Cottage cheese                                 100g                                                                      60mg Broccoli                                                60g                                                                        15mg   Pottsville and Cabarita Physiotherapy 6676 4000 visit www.osteoporosis.org.au

Have you been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and worried about what the future holds? 

18.10.18

Have you been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and worried about what the future holds? 

Do you want to optimise your quality of life now and in the future? Parkinson’s disease is a debilitating disorder, where nerve cells in a part of the brain that produce dopamine are affected. The nerve damage affects the brain’s control of the muscles, which causes shaking (tremor), increased muscle stiffness, slowed movements and balance problems. Parkinson’s disease also affects your thinking abilities, especially the ability to control and regulate behaviour, and may cause anxiety and depression. Drugs can control the symptoms in most patients, but unfortunately only for a limited time.

How can exercise help?

Exercise benefits the health and wellbeing of people with Parkinson’s disease in many ways. By increasing fitness, exercise protects against many complications of the disease. For example, better mobility may improve quality of life and prolong independent living. Exercise may also have positive effects on mood and improve brain function and make drug therapy more effective. It also provides a means by which individuals can actively participate in the management of their disease. Walking speed in people with Parkinson’s disease is related to muscle strength in the legs, so exercise programs focuses on  increasing leg strength are beneficial. Programs using resistance training like Clinical Pilates, increase muscle mass and strength, and also improve step length, walking speed and walking distance. Rhythmic stimulation of the brain via the eyes or ears while walking can help, and balance training combined with resistance training (like Clinical Pilates) can improve balance and stability. ‘Cueing exercises’ involve walking while listening or seeing cues that mimic the rhythm of walking. These exercises can help improve your walking movements and overcome difficulty with gait initiation and freezing. ‘Dance’ provides exercise to music that can facilitate functional and expressive movement. It also provides important social interaction and can lead to improvements in perceived quality of life. ‘Dual tasking’ exercises, where a secondary task (like counting backwards) while walking can help. These exercises usually try to improve one aspect of walking at a time.

The Parkinson’s Program we run at Pottsville and Cabarita Physio caters for individual abilities and incorporate all the above factors.